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{excerpt-include:Scanning And Proofreading Manual|nopanel=true}

h1. 4.8  Y.  Format for image description tags

[Back to:  *4. Proofread a Book*|4. Proofread a book#4_advanced_proofreading_topics]\\

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              [1)  Definition|#definition]
              [2)  Use a unique string to identify image descriptions|#use_a_unique_string_to_identify_image_descriptions]
              [3)  Structure|#structure]
                   [a.  Format to use for image descriptions with Captions|#format_to_use_for_image_descriptions_with_captions]
                   [b.  Elements of the image description Tag|#elements_of_the_image_description_tag]
              [4)  An example|#an_example]
              [5)  Layout|#layout]
                   [a.  Placement on the page|#placement_on_the_page]
                   [b.  Separate each image description with a blank line|#separate_each_image_description_with_a_blank_line]
                   [c.  If page numbers are 'footers', be sure they are the "last item on the page"|#if_page_numbers_are_footers_be_sure_they_are_the_last_item_on_the_page]
              [6)  Reminder:  Don't add text if it's not in the original book!|#reminder_don't_add_text_if_it's_not_in_the_original_book]

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h2. 1)  Definition

      Correctly or incorrectly, the phrase "image description" has been used to mean any of the following:
      *\-*  an image description, only
      *\-*  an image description plus a caption
      *\-*  an image caption, only.

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h2. 2)  Use a unique string to identify image descriptions

      The string below should be unique enough to identify image description tags within most files:

      {color:blue}*\[image:*{color}

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      The goal is to have one tag identify every image description in a file so they can be programmatically
      manipulated.
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h2. 3)  Structure

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h3.       A.  Format to use for image descriptions with Captions

      {color:blue}*\[image: A young boy in mid-air as he dives off a pier into a small lake.  Already in the water is*{color}
      {color:blue}*an older man, standing and smiling.*{color}
      {color:blue}*"Having fun on hot days."\]*{color}

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h3.       B.  Elements of the image description Tag

           1.  open square bracket

           2.  "image: "                                 (without the quotes:  the text "image", a colon, 1 space)

           3.  the image description

           4.  a period                                  (wouldn't this help Assistive Technology devices?)

           5.  a Paragraph Mark                    (so that the caption element starts on the next line;  wouldn't
                                                              this make it easier to QC, to verify that the image describer
                                                              has included both the description _and_ the caption?)

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;6.&nbsp; <the caption>

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;7.&nbsp; if not present, a period

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;8.&nbsp; close square bracket

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h2. 4)&nbsp; An example

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; In the following example:
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; *\-*&nbsp; there are 2 images on one page
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; *\-*&nbsp; the page number was a 'footer'&nbsp; (at the bottom of the page).

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*.......................................*{color} {color:blue}Page Break{color} {color:blue}*.......................................*{color}

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*\[image: A girl with a pretty smile, standing outside, wearing a traditional outfit*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*with beads and large buttons on it.*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*"This girl helps her family herd yaks in the north. She belongs to an ethnic group*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*known as the Kirghiz."\]*{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*\[image: A man wearing a turban smiles as if he is laughing.*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*"Many Afghan men wear turbans, both as a sign of respect for Allah and as protection*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*from the hot sun."\]*{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}4{color}&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <<&nbsp; this is the page number
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*.......................................*{color} {color:blue}Page Break{color} {color:blue}*.......................................*{color}

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h2. 5)&nbsp; Layout

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h3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; A.&nbsp; Placement on the page

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Place image descriptions near the text to which they refer, as much as can be determined.
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;(This is not critical.)

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Except in textbooks, sometimes the flow of the narrative can be made easier to experience if all
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;image decriptions on a page are grouped together and then placed either above the body of text,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;or below the body of text.

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Rationale:&nbsp; This way a reader may choose to read only _the body of text_ from one page to
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;the next, maintaining the narrative flow.&nbsp; Since many pages have 2 or more images, a reader
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;using AT could encounter the first instance of an image description and then immediately
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;skip to the body of text on the next page.

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h3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; B.&nbsp; Separate each image description with a blank line

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;*\-*&nbsp; Image descriptions can be easier to QC if separated by a blank line.

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;*\-*&nbsp; The blank line will of course be removed by the RTF Converter.

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h3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; C.&nbsp; If page numbers are 'footers', be sure they are the "last item on the page"

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;If page numbers are footers (at the bottom of each page and not at the top), be sure that the
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;page numbers and not image descriptions, are the last item on the page.

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;This could help the RTF Converter determine pagination, especially if the book has many pages
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;that contain image descriptions.

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;So:

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*.......................................*{color} {color:blue}Page Break{color} {color:blue}*.......................................*{color}

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< page # >{color}&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; (if page #s are 'headers')

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< chapter heading >{color}&nbsp; &nbsp; (if it exists)

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< body of text on this page >{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*\[image: A girl with a pretty smile, standing outside, wearing a traditional outfit*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*with beads and large buttons on it.*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*"This girl helps her family herd yaks in the north. She belongs to an ethnic group*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*known as the Kirghiz."\]*{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*\[image: A man wearing a turban smiles as if he is laughing.*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*"Many Afghan men wear turbans, both as a sign of respect for Allah and as protection*{color}
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*from the hot sun."\]*{color}

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}< page # >{color}&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; (if page #s are 'footers')

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; {color:blue}*.......................................*{color} {color:blue}Page Break{color} {color:blue}*.......................................*{color}

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h2. 6)&nbsp; Reminder:&nbsp; Don't add text if it's not in the original book!

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&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; *\-*&nbsp; The rule of the thumb is:&nbsp; _never do this._
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; *\-*&nbsp; There are a few exceptions, such as labeling blank pages, or adding page numbers to pages that
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; didn't originally have them.

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; For those rare cases where text {color:teal}*is*{color} added that is not in the original, please always place any
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; added text within square brackets.

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; An exception to this last rule is the adding of page numbers.&nbsp; Do not place square brackets around
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; page numbers.

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h2. [To the next Section:&nbsp; *4.9 Glossary*|GLOSSARY]\\

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