4. Proofread a book

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4.  Proofread a book

          *  This main page,  "4. Proofread a book", contains short summaries of instructions.
          *  More detailed instructions on each topic as well as screenshots can be found by clicking on
             each link that follows the phrase:
               Tell me more about:


          4.1  Before you begin proofreading
                 A.  Go to the Checkout List
                 B.  How to Check out a book for proofreading
                 C.  View information about a book
                 D.  Automated emails you may receive, and steps to take
                 E.  Options you can take when a scan has problems
                 F.  Do searches before choosing a book to proofread


          4.2  Proofreading instructions


          4.3  Using Assistive Technology software to proofread

          4.4  Renew your book in 60 seconds

          4.5  Release a book

          4.6  How to Check in your finished proof

          4.7  After Check in

          4.8  Advanced proofreading topics

          4.9  Common word processing software used to proofread


          GLOSSARY


4.1  Before you begin proofreading

        If you ARE a new Proofreader, please:
             1.  Read topics A. through E., below.
             2.  Find the book you've been assigned to proofread.
             3.  The searches in section F. Do searches before choosing a book to proofread are optional.
             4.  Begin proofreading.

        If you are NOT a new Proofreader, please:
             1.  Read topics A. through E., below.
             2.  Choose a book to proofread.
             3.  Use section F. Do searches before choosing a book to proofread, to check that it's OK to
                  proofread this book.
             4.  Begin proofreading.


        A.  Go to the Checkout List

             1)  How to get to the Checkout List
                  a.  Log in, using the email address you provided when you signed up.
                  b.  After you log in, the blue bar at the top of the page is your Task Bar.
                  c.  On the left side of your Task Bar, select Volunteer Home.
                  d.  On the left side of the Volunteer Home page, under In This Section, select Checkout a Book.

             2)  Search the Checkout List by title or author
                  a.  Find the field labeled "Search for title or author".
                  b.  In this field, enter the book title or author name you are looking for.
                  c.  Press enter, or click on Update button.

               Tell me more about:    Go to the Checkout List


        B.  How to Check out a book for proofreading

             1)  Go to the Checkout List  (See section 4.1 A for how to get to the Checkout List)

             2)  How to Check out a book
                  a.  Find the line with the title of the book you wish to check out.
                  b.  In the Action column, click Check out.
                  c.  Save the file to the folder on your computer that you've chosen for this download.

             3)  Check out limits
                  a.  You cannot proofread a book that you have scanned.
                  b.  At any one time, you may have up to 5 books checked out into your My Checked Out
                       Books area.


               Tell me more about:    How to Check out a book for proofreading


        C.  View information about a book

             1)  View the metadata of a book
                  a.  Click on a book's title to read the book's metadata.
                  b.  For Bookshare, metadata is data about the book, such as the book's title, author, synopsis,
                       ISBN number, etc.

             2)  View the Book Processing History of your book
                  a.  On the book's metadata page, find the section titled Related Links.
                  b.  In that section, click the link View Book History.
                  c.  In the column labeled Comments, there may be information from a Bookshare
                       administrator, or helpful information about this scan that the Submitter may have provided
                       for the Proofreader.


               Tell me more about:    View information about a book


        D.  Automated emails you may receive, and steps to take

             Below are the titles of some of the emails one may receive in the process of becoming an active
              Bookshare Volunteer:

             1)  "Your volunteering application has been received"
             2)  "Welcome To Bookshare Volunteering"
             3)  "Your book is about to expire"
             4)  "Your book has expired"
             5)  "Your book has been submitted"
             6)  "Your book has been marked for more editing"
             7)  "Status of the book you submitted to Bookshare"
             8)  "The book you submitted to Bookshare is now in the library"
             9)  "A book you validated has been accepted by Bookshare"


               Tell me more about:    Automated emails you may receive, and steps to take


        E.  Options you can take when a scan has problems

             1)  Knowing when to Reject a book
                  It may be appropriate to "recommend that a book be rejected" for reasons such as:
                  -  the book is already in the library,
                  -  it's lacking a title page, or lacking a copyright notice,
                  -  it has areas of junk characters that make the text unreadable, or
                  -  it is missing pages.

             2)  If a book has problems, options to try first before Rejecting
                  a.  Obtain a physical copy of the book to make the corrections,
                  b.  Join the Volunteer Discussion List and request that someone rescan a page or two,
                  c.  Contact the Submitter, who may still have the physical copy that they scanned.

             3)  How to contact the Submitter (the person who scanned the book)
                  The Submitter may have provided their email address, which would then be in the
                  Book Processing History of the book.
                  a.  After logging in, go to Volunteer Home and then My Checked Out Books.
                  b.  Click on the Title of the book.
                  c.  In the section titled Related Links, click View book history.
                  d.  You are now at the Book Processing History page.  Scroll to the bottom.
                  e.  If the Submitter has provided their email address, it will be in the Comments column.

             4)  How to Reject a book
                  If you've tried to fix problems in the scan and believe they cannot be fixed, please Reject it.
                  a.  After logging in, go to Volunteer Home and then My Checked Out Books.
                  b.  In the Action column, click on the Reject link (not "Release"!).
                  c.  Select the most appropriate reason to reject the book from the drop-down list.
                  d.  If necessary, into the Comment box enter brief details about your decision to Reject.
                  e.  Click Reject Book.

             5)  What happens if I "recommend a book for rejection?"
                  An Administrator will do a review and either withdraw the book from the system if they agree
                  with your recommendation, or return it to the Checkout List to be proofread.


               Tell me more about:    Options you can take when a scan has problems


        F.  Do searches before choosing a book to proofread

              First, log in to Bookshare.org, using the email address you provided when you signed up.


              1)  Search the Bookshare library  (aka 'the collection')
                   Use Bookshare's Advanced Search by doing a Control + Click on the link below to open
                   a new tab in your browser.  Then, this window will remain open to come back to after doing
                   the search.

                   Bookshare Advanced Search

                   For tips on searching the collection, visit our "Find Books" page at:
                   http://www.bookshare.org/_/gettingStarted/findBooks


              2)  Search "Books In Process"
                   Check the Books In Process pages to see if the book has already been submitted.  The link
                   to Books In Process is on the Volunteer Home page is an area called "In This Section".
                   Or you may  Control + Click  on the link below to open the page in a new tab in your browser:

                   Books In Process

              5)  The New York Times top-ten list
                   -  Bookshare will process in-house, books that are on the top-ten list of New York Times
                      bestsellers (in the adult fiction and non-fiction categories).
                   -  If a book has been released in the past two weeks, before proofreading this book,
                      volunteers should consider whether or not it is likely to make the New York Times
                      Best Seller List in the near future.


               Tell me more about:    Do searches before choosing a book to proofread



4.2.  Proofreading instructions

          How Bookshare uses the term "proofreading"

          In contrast to common usage of the term "proofreading", Bookshare proofreaders:
          *  cannot add any text to the book, and
          *  cannot change any text in the book.

          There are a few exceptions, described later.

          Please remember:  You can't proofread a book that you have scanned

          Some volunteers scan books, some volunteers proofread books, and some do both.  The choice is
          yours!  The only restriction is that you can't proofread a book that you have scanned.



          We've divided proofreading instructions into four sections:

          A.  Proofreading Training

          B.  Steps not Technically Necessary

          C.  Required proofreading steps

          D.  Optional proofreading steps


        A.  

                Scanning a book actually involves two processes.  First, the scanner takes a picture of each
                page.  Second, OCR software is run on these pictures.  The OCR tries to figure out the correct
                letters and words in each picture.

                However, even the best scanner and best OCR software make mistakes!  Proofreading for
                Bookshare means finding and fixing these OCR mistakes.  Please understand that
                proofreading in this sense does not involve making edits to what the writer has written,
                only corrections to the scanning process.

                Special formatting is also required so that these books can be read properly by the devices
                and software used by individuals with print disabilities.

                Click below to access a training book, instructions on how to complete it, and what it should look
                like when you're done.

                 Tell me more about:    Proofreading Training

        C.  Required proofreading steps

                1.  Replace section breaks with page breaks

                     1)  Never delete any Breaks in the file!

                     2)  A file will contain either Section Breaks or Page Breaks.
                          We want the file to end up containing only Page Breaks.
                          If your file already contains Page Breaks, you can skip to the next section.

                     3)  Do a Global Replace using Word's Find and Replace dialog
                          -  Go to the very beginning of the file by doing a  Ctrl  +  Home
                          -  In the Find what box type:       ^b
                          -  In the Replace with box type:   ^p^m^p
                          -  Click Replace All


                       Tell me more about:    Replace section breaks with page breaks


                2.  Do some formatting

                     1)  Which file format to use?  Always in RTF.

                     2)  Page length (also called "paper height"):  22 inches  (the largest possible)
                          Page width:  8.5 inches

                     3)  Font style for the entire book:  Times New Roman

                     4)  Use these font sizes:         For the:
                          20 point  +  BOLDING        Book title
                          18 point  +  BOLDING        Larger section headings  (such as "Part I", or "Section 2")
                          16 point  +  BOLDING        Headings for each section in the Front Matter, & Back Matter
                          16 point  +  BOLDING        Chapter headings
                          14 point  +  BOLDING        Chapter subheadings
                          12 point                             Text in the body of the book

                     5)  Maximum font size for anything in the file:       =  20 point
                          Minimum font size for anything in the file:        =   8 point


                       Tell me more about:    Do some formatting


                3.  Proof the front matter and back matter

                     1)  Format the heading for any section in the Front Matter:
                          16 point  +  BOLDING

                     2)  Table of Contents
                          -  It can be in straight text, or in a Word table.
                          -  If in a Word table, make sure the table reads across correctly.

                     3)  Match entries in the ToC with the same information in the body of the book:
                          -  Match each chapter number, chapter title, and page number.

                     4)  Format the heading for any section in the Back Matter:
                          16 point  +  BOLDING

                     5)  If any one section in the Back Matter is 3 pages or less, proof it.  Otherwise, optional.


                       Tell me more about:    Proof the front matter and back matter


                4.  Blank pages,  Manual line breaks,  Paragraphs between speakers

                     1)  Blank pages
                          a.  Don't delete any blank pages.
                          b.  Give every blank page a page number just as with any other page in the book.
                          c.  Label each blank page as below, using square brackets:
                               [BLANK PAGE]


                     2)  Manual line breaks
                          a.  Find Manual Line Breaks by searching on:
                                ^l      (caret, lower case letter 'L')

                          b.  When the author intends a paragraph to exist:
                                -  Replace each Line Break with a Paragraph Mark.

                          c.  When the end of a paragraph is not intended and the OCR has put in a
                                Manual Line Break instead of a space:
                                -  Replace the Manual Line Break with 1 space.


                     3)  Paragraphs between speakers
                          a.  The following should be 2 lines, not 1, so that this:
                                    "Did to!" "Did not!"
                               Becomes this:
                                    "Did to!"
                                    "Did not!"

                          b.  Search for these and replace each instance individually.   Search for:
                                    " "         (double quote, space, double quote)
                                Check each instance and if appropriate, Replace with:
                                    "^p"      (double quote, caret, lower case letter 'p', double quote)


                       Tell me more about:    Blank pages, Manual line breaks, Paras between speakers


                5.  Page numbers

                     1)  Make sure every page has a page number
                          a.  Number all pages that occur before the "first numbered page in the book"
                                i.  Find the first numbered page in the book.
                               ii.  Use Arabic numbers to "back-number" the pages that come before the first
                                    numbered page in the book, until you get to page "1".
                              iii.  If there are still more pages to back-number, continue back-numbering but now
                                    use lower-case Roman numerals.
                          b.  Number all blank pages, whether they occur in the Front Matter, the body of the book,
                               or the Back Matter.
                          c.  Number the first page of every chapter.
                          d.  Number all pages in the Back Matter.

                     2)  Page numbers in the body of book should match those in the ToC (Table of Contents).

                     3)  Page numbers can be at the tops or at the bottoms of pages.

                     4)  Page numbers must:
                          a.  Be on a separate line, by themselves
                               (a page number should be the only thing on its line)
                          b.  Be in correct order.
                          c.  Be only 1 per page  (no page should have more than 1 page number).
                          d.  Not be duplicated  (eg, there should not be 2 pages numbered "168").

                     5)  Page numbers do not have to be any particular font size.
                          However, please see  "4)  Font sizes"  above, under  2.  Do some formatting.

                     6)  If the OCR has put page numbers into Word Fields, "fix the page numbers into text".


                       Tell me more about:    Page numbers


                6.  Remove running headers or running footers

                     1)  GOAL:  Keep the page numbers, remove the other stuff

                     2)  A Running Header or Running Footer is text that recurs at the tops (or bottoms) of pages
                          throughout the body of the book.

                     3)  A Running Header or Footer can be the Title of the book, the Author, or the title of
                          each Chapter.

                     4)  Usually there will be a Page Number on the same line as a Running Header or Footer
                          -  If a Page Number is present on the same line as a Running Header or Footer, remove all
                              text except the page number  (leave the page number as the only item on the line).
                          -  If a Page Number is not present, remove the entire line with the Running Header.


                       Tell me more about:    Remove running headers or running footers


                7.  Hyphens  (aka Dashes)

                     1)  Reconnect hyphenated words that are broken across two pages
                          a.  Search for these by typing "-^p" in the "Find what" box in Word.
                          b.  Reconnect the two pieces:  Cut the last part of the word on the second page, and
                               paste it to the first part of the word on the first page.

                     2)  Remove spaces before and after hyphens, and m-dashes
                          a.  Remove a space after a single hyphen.
                          b.  Remove spaces before and after instances of 2 hyphens in a row.
                          c.  Remove spaces before and after m-dashes.


                       Tell me more about:    Hyphens  (aka Dashes)


                8.  Standardize ellipses

                     1)  Replace each "ellipsis character" with 3 periods
                          -  Search for these by typing "^0133" in the "Find what" box in Word.

                     2)  No spaces before nor within ellipses
                          -  Make sure there are no spaces before the 3 periods.
                          -  Make sure there are no spaces between any of the 3 periods.


                       Tell me more about:    Standardize ellipses


                9.  Replace bullet points with asterisks

                     1)  Search for these by typing "^0149" in the "Find what" box in Word.
                     2)  Replace each bullet point individually with an asterisk.
                     3)  There should be 1 space after the asterisk.


                       Tell me more about:    Replace bullet points with asterisks


               10.  Do a Spell Check to catch typical "scannos"

                     1)  Spell Check the entire file to correct scannos (mistakes made by the OCR ) and other
                          types of errors.  (But do not change what the author has written!)
                     2)  Click below for an example of a scanno that will be invisible to the Spell Checker.
                     3)  Click below to also read about other patterns of common scannos.


                       Tell me more about:    Do a Spell Check to catch typical scannos


               11.  Important additional information

                     1)  Correct obvious scanning and formatting errors.
                     2)  Don't correct any errors made by the Author or Editor!
                     3)  Only remove illegible text if doing so does not affect the Page Numbering.
                     4)  Don't add any text of your own to the book.
                     5)  Do remove all "Running Headers" and "Running Footers".


                       Tell me more about:    Important additional information


        D.  Optional proofreading steps

                *  An author may add extra space between two paragraphs to indicate a change of scene
                    or a pause in the narrative.
                *  To retain this space between the paragraphs, use 3 asterisks on a line by themselves.


                 Tell me more about:    Optional proofreading steps



Top of   4. Proofread a book



4.3  Using Assistive Technology software to proofread

        Many hundreds of Bookshare volunteers are also Bookshare Members:  a particularly active and
        engaged core of the volunteer community who also have a print disability (such as blindness).

        Member volunteers use Assistive Technology (AT) devices and software in order to scan and
        sometimes also to proofread books.  A few examples of AT software used to scan and proofread are:
        Kurzweil 1000, OpenBook, JAWS, and Victor Reader Soft.


        A.  Proofreading using Kurzweil 1000 or Microsoft Word: A Checklist

             Contributed by Bookshare volunteer  Mayrie ReNae


        B.  Proofreading using Kurzweil 1000 software

             Contributed by Bookshare volunteer  Mayrie ReNae



Top of   4. Proofread a book



4.4  Renew your book in 60 seconds

        A.  Go to your My Checked Out Books page
             1)  Log in, using the email address you provided when you signed up.
             2)  On the left side of your Task Bar, select Volunteer Home.
             3)  On the left side of the Volunteer Home page, under In This Section, select My Checked
                  Out Books.

        B.  Renew your book
             1)  Find the line with the book you wish to Renew.
             2)  In the Action column, click Renew.
             3)  That's it! The Renew link has disappeared.

        C.  Please notify Bookshare if the book has a "Hold for" and your name on it.
             1)  No one else will check out this book if it has a "Hold for" and your name on it.   It will
                  remain in the Checkout List.
             2)  Please let us know if this is the case so we may reassign the book and move it
                  closer to becoming available to the communities we serve.


         Tell me more about:    Renew your book in 60 seconds



4.5  Release a book

        A.  Go to your My Checked Out Books page.  (See section 4.1 A for how to get to the Checkout List)

        B.  Release your book
             1)  Find the line with the book you wish to Release.
             2)  In the Action column, click Release.
             3)  The book will disappear from your My Checked Out Books page and be moved back into
                  the Checkout List.

        C.  Please notify Bookshare if the book has a "Hold for" and your name on it


         Tell me more about:    Release a book



4.6  How to Check in your finished proof

        A.  The file must be in the format:  RTF

        B.  Go to your My Checked Out Books page.  (See section 4.1 A for how to get to the Checkout List)

        C.  On the line with your book, in the Action column, click Check in.
             DO NOT use the "Submit a Book" link in the upper left of your My Checked Out Books page.

        D.  Go through a series of screens as you Check in (ie upload) your finished proof to Bookshare.

        E.  Examples guide you to proofread the metadata that was entered by the Submitter, and make
             any necessary edits or insertions.

        F.  You'll receive an email letting you know that this book was either:
              -  added to the Bookshare library, or
              -  returned to the Checkout List where you may check it out to complete editing.


         Tell me more about:    How to Check in your finished proof



4.7  After Check in

        Please save your emails.  After checking in your book, you should receive one of the 3 emails below.

        1.  You may receive an email notifying you that your proof has been accepted into the library.
              -  Thank you for helping to grow the Bookshare library!

        2.  You may receive an email notifying you that your proof needs more editing.  This email will
              include comments that begin:  "To the Proofreader:", and explain what needs to be done.
              -  To finish editing, Check out (download) this book from the Checkout List, just as before.

        3.  You may receive an email which includes comments that begin:  "To the Submitter:".
              -  This email is only for the Submitter (the person who scanned the book).
              -  You don't need to do anything.  This email has also been sent to you to notify you of the status
                  of the book in the book pipeline.


         Tell me more about:    After Check in



Top of   4. Proofread a book


4.8  Advanced proofreading topics

        A.  Creating written descriptions of Pedigree and Ancestor Charts

             Contributed by Bookshare volunteer Judy S.

             A technique that allows a sighted Submitter or Proofreader to consistently describe pedigree
             charts and ancestor charts that are sometimes found in books.  These are not family tree charts,
             but instead are the type of genealogy charts that trace back the ancestors of one particular person,
             or of a pedigreed horse or dog.

               Tell me more about:    Creating written descriptions of Pedigree and Ancestor Charts



        B.  Customizing Word 2003

             Contributed by Bookshare volunteer Judy S.

             Stop automatic conversion:
             1)  to border lines,
             2)  of regular quotes to smart quotes, and
             3)  of regular dashes to em dashes.

               Tell me more about:    Customizing Word 2003



        C.  Footnotes, Superscripts and Subscripts, and Sidebars

             1)  Footnotes
                  a.  Don't delete them.
                  b.  Enclose a footnote in square brackets.
                  c.  For multiple footnotes that occur on one page, group them together at the bottom of the page.
                       Then enclose the entire group of footnotes within one set of square brackets.
                       (For an example, follow the link below to the detail page.)

             2)  Superscripts and Subscripts
                  a.  If footnote numbers or footnote letters are superscripted or subscripted, leave them that way.
                  b.  The same holds true if footnote numbers or footnote letters are not superscripted or
                       subscripted:  leave them as they are.
                  c.  Put parentheses around each footnote number or footnote letter.
                       Also, if not already there, add a space between the footnote number or footnote letter and
                       the word before it.

                       In the body of the text, change this:
                       Unemployment rose in the middle of this decade1.

                       to this:
                       Unemployment rose in the middle of this decade (1).


                       In the footnote itself, change this:
                       1Applies to the years 2006-2008.

                       to this:
                       (1) Applies to the years 2006-2008.


             3)  Sidebars
                  a.  At your discretion, place a sidebar either:
                       -  below the body of text on the same page, or
                       -  within the body of text on the same page.
                  b.  If a sidebar's content is identical to text in the body of the page, that sidebar can be deleted.

               Tell me more about:    Footnotes, Superscripts and Subscripts, and Sidebars



        D.  Fractions, Columns, Abbreviation standards

             1)  Fractions
                   a.  Simple fractions:  Use 3 characters for them.
                   b.  Compound fractions:  They may have a dash, or not.
                   c.  Decimal fractions:  It's fine to use them.
                   d.  Stop MS Word from using "one character fractions".

             2)  Columns

             3)  Abbreviation standards
                   a.  Spell out abbreviations to eliminate ambiguity.
                   b.  Terms for Temperature may be abbreviated.
                   c.  Case does matter!

               Tell me more about:    Fractions, Columns, Abbreviation standards



4.9  Common word processing software used to proofread

        A.  Proofreading using Microsoft Word 2003

             Contributed by Bookshare volunteer Judy S.


        B.  Proofreading using Microsoft Word 2007

             Bookshare's  Volunteer Proofreading Guide,  in MS Word



GLOSSARY



Top of   4. Proofread a book
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Page: 4.1 A. Go to the Checkout List
Page: 4.1 B. How to Check out a book for proofreaowding
Page: 4.1 C. View information about a book
Page: 4.1 D. Automated emails you may receive, and steps to take
Page: 4.1 E. Options you can take when a scan has problems
Page: 4.1 F. Do searches before choosing a book to proofread
Page: 4.2 A. Proofreading Training
Page: 4.2 B. Steps not technically necessary
Page: 4.2 C. 1. Replace section breaks with page breaks
Page: 4.2 C. 2. Do some formatting
Page: 4.2 C. 3. Proof the front matter and back matter
Page: 4.2 C. 4. Blank pages, Manual line breaks, Paragraphs between speakers
Page: 4.2 C. 5. Page numbers
Page: 4.2 C. 6. Remove running headers or running footers
Page: 4.2 C. 7. Hyphens (aka Dashes)
Page: 4.2 C. 8. Standardize ellipses
Page: 4.2 C. 9. Replace bullet points with asterisks
Page: 4.2 C. 10. Do a Spell Check to catch typical scannos
Page: 4.2 C. 11. Important additional information
Page: 4.2 C. 12. Examples of common scannos
Page: 4.2 D. Optional proofreading steps
Page: 4.3 A. Proofreading using Kurzweil 1000 or Microsoft Word - A Checklist
Page: 4.3 B. Proofreading using Kurzweil 1000 software
Page: 4.4 Renew your book in 60 seconds
Page: 4.5 Release a book
Page: 4.6 How to Check in your finished proof
Page: 4.7 After Check in
Page: 4.8 A. Creating written descriptions of Pedigree and Ancestor Charts
Page: 4.8 B. Customizing Word 2003
Page: 4.8 C. Footnotes, Superscripts and Subscripts, and Sidebars
Page: 4.8 D. Fractions, Columns, Abbreviation standards
Page: 4.9 A. Proofreading using Microsoft Word 2003
Page: 4.9 B. Proofreading using Microsoft Word 2007